Native Hawaiian

Pūkoʻa no nā ʻEwa Council

ulu tree leaves set against a blue sky

Pūkoʻa no nā ʻEwa is the recommending and advisory body of Leeward Community College concerning issues pertaining to Hawaiian language, culture, and history, and other matters as they impact Native Hawaiians and Native Hawaiian programs. The Council also represents Leeward Community College as part of the larger Pūkoʻa Council, which includes similar councils from all ten UH system campuses.

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Makahiki Celebration

Hoʻoulu presents a Makahiki Celebration on December 10 from 12 noon to 4 pm.

Come and join the end of the semester Makahiki Celebration. There will be FREE bentos for the first 100 students on a first-come bases. The celebration will have live music starting at 2:00 P.M., along with movies and popcorn in D 102. There will be prizes given out every hour and cultural games being conducted on the grass adjacent to AD 102.

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Native Hawaiian STEM Opportunities

In an effort to increase Native Hawaiians in science, technological, engineering, and math career fields and to nurture all Leeward CC students' passion for place-based sciences, Hālau ʻIke o Puʻuloa offers a wide array of culturally rich S.T.E.M. support activities.  From counseling to tutoring to mālama ʻāina to guest speakers, we want to help you graduate with an ʻike Hawaiʻi rich Associate of Science in Natural Sciences degree!

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Ke Ala ʻIke Scholar Lei o ka Lanakila Graduation Application

Aloha Prospective Ke Ala ʻIke Papa 2015 Graduates

The procedures for completing the Ke Ala ʻIke program and qualifying as a graduate have changed.

ALL Scholars who wish to earn a place in the Ke Ala ʻIke Graduation Ceremony MUST begin the process by:

1) Applying to graduate NO LATER THAN:  February 15, 2015 at: http://go.hawaii.edu/nH

AND

2) Attending one of the MANDATORY Orientation Sessions on either February 18 or 19.

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Ke Ala ʻIke Graduates Manaʻo

  • "I will never forget this day, the Kīhei Hoʻokomo was powerful I could feel the presence of my kupuna and felt so haʻahaʻa in being able to accomplish the kuleana needed to be a part of this awesome ʻohana. Seeing all of the graduates in this ceremony was priceless. The formal ceremony was memorable, to be given the honor in leading the entire graduating class of 2014 was a proud moment. To see Kanaka Maoli leading the way was maikaʻi loa. What was even more special was watching to Ke Ala ʻIke haumāna give speeches.
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